How to use a roundabout

A roundabout is a circular intersection without stop signs or traffic signals. Traffic flows counterclockwise around a central island.
The benefits? Roundabouts improve traffic flow. They reduce serious crashes, injuries and fatalities because they virtually eliminate the chance of a head-on or right-angle collisions. They improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists. Roundabouts can even reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Roundabouts

Tips for drivers

  • You’ll see crosswalks on the entry legs to the roundabout. You need to yield to any pedestrians or cyclists in the crosswalk and be sure you don’t block it.
  • Yield to traffic that’s already inside the roundabout—it has the right of way.
  • Drive counter-clockwise within the asphalt lane.
  • There is usually a raised or colored apron around the center island in the roundabout. It’s there for large trucks and emergency vehicles only. Stay off that area.
  • It’s there for large trucks and emergency vehicles only. Stay off that area.
  • Keep moving while you’re in the roundabout. If an emergency vehicle approaches, don’t block its path.
  • When you’re leaving the roundabout, signal a right turn just before you exit. That lets drivers waiting to enter the roundabout and pedestrians waiting to cross know your intentions.
  • Yield to pedestrians crossing the exit lane.

Tips for cyclists

  • Cyclists can ride either with traffic or on the cycling pathway.
  • If you’re riding on the road, merge with traffic before you enter the roundabout.
  • If you’re using the cycle path:

– Enter the roundabout via the ramp that extends from the shoulder of the road.
– Watch your speed when you’re on the pathway, and be aware of pedestrians.
– Dismount and use the marked crosswalks to cross the intersecting streets.

Tips for pedestrians

  • When you’re crossing the legs of a roundabout, always use the marked crosswalks.
  • Just like crossing any road, wait for a gap in traffic, or until all vehicles are stopped.
  • Don’t cross to the center island.
  • Be aware of cyclists sharing the crosswalk and pathways.
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